Lab In Need

Daisy Joy


2019-10-29: Daisy Joy lives up to her name. Whenever she is around, people can’t help but smile. But this bouncing bundle of love wasn’t always so carefree. When we rescued her in May from Riverside County Shelter, she was an obvious case of severe neglect.

You name the issue, Daisy Joy likely had it. Her ears were a mess (shut, closed, covered in scar tissue, with dark discharge from untreated infections), kennel cough, missing hair on her body, growths all over her body, and her stomach was black from untreated skin issues. Our Dr. thinks she was probably used for breeding, and now discarded at 7 years old since she is no longer useful for that purpose.

The most troubling thing with Daisy is that when we started to treat her infections, she would get better and then a week later she was ill again. Finally, she was diagnosed with MRSP (methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius) that is resistant to most antibiotics. After numerous cytology tests and skin scrapings we ordered special antibiotics through a compound pharmacy and she began to get better.

Since then she’s been spayed and had several lumps removed from her belly. Despite all of this Daisy remains the life of the party at her foster home, snuggling with the people, playing with the dogs, and always carrying her favorite ball.

As Daisy blossomed, her foster mom was excited that it was finally time for her to find a family of her own. However recently, new growths have started to grow around her mammary glands and her rear mammary glands have fluid that can be squeezed out. Her Dr. has also has begun to hear an abnormal sound in her lungs.

It is evident, that poor Daisy Joy needs further testing. She needs X-rays and an ultrasound to take samples of the growths and send them to cytology to see if there are any masses in her lungs which would be indicative of cancer. If they are cancer, and have not spread, she will need to have them removed. It’s our deepest hope this sweet girl gets a break and it is not cancer.

Fortunately for Daisy she is very loved and cared by her foster mom and has a place to call home for as long as she needs, and expert care to nurse back to health once again. But we need your help in funding these treatments.

Previous bills for Daisy’s care have totaled more than $2,000 and new estimates just for diagnostics is well over $1,500.

Can you help? No amount is too small, and every little bit is appreciated. Daisy, her foster mom and all the volunteers at SCLRR appreciate your consideration.

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This girl cannot catch a break. Here is the newest update on her from her foster mom: She had a large mass pop up really quickly a few weeks ago. Needle tested, strange result – white blood cells. At worst possibly skin cancer. It has totally gone away now. Dr. isn’t sure what to think, just to watch the area. Her ears had another bacterial infection, cleared up now. She will probably have chronic ear infections but not too much closing of the ear canal so there is hope we can keep them clear. She ‘leaks’ a little urine – no UTI, just age and late spay. Still watching her masses carefully, she has multiple pea sized masses that have tested ‘inconclusive’. When they did her ultrasound they made note of the size and location of each mass. We will need to watch those very carefully to make sure they do not grow into something else. Her lungs are still clear. At the moment the most worrisome issue is a 6 mm kidney stone in her left kidney. It is not bothering her right now and not blocking anything. Dr. advised to watch her carefully and between the masses and kidney stone she should have ultrasounds every 6 or so months.

2020-04-14 Daisy Joy lives up to her name. Whenever she is around, people can’t help but smile. But this bouncing bundle of love wasn’t always so carefree. When we rescued her last May from Riverside County Shelter, she was an obvious case of severe neglect.

You name the issue, Daisy Joy likely had it. Her ears were a mess (shut, closed, covered in scar tissue, with dark discharge from untreated infections), kennel cough, missing hair on her body, growths all over her body, and her stomach was black from untreated skin issues. Her vet thinks she was probably used for breeding, and then discarded at 7 years old since she is no longer useful for that purpose.

The most troubling thing with Daisy is that when we started to treat her infections, she would get better and then a week later she was ill again. Finally, she was diagnosed with MRSP (methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius) that is resistant to most antibiotics. After numerous cytology tests and skin scrapings we ordered special antibiotics through a compound pharmacy and she began to get better.

Because of all the health issues we had with her, we made the decision to keep her as our permanent foster and not place her with a family. Fortunately for Daisy she is very loved and cared by her foster parents and has a place to call home for as long as she needs.

Sadly about 12 days ago we noticed that she stopped using her right hind leg and would not put any weight on it. Turns out she has a dislocated right hip now. The vet believes that the ligaments attaching the femur to the hip socket are torn beyond repair. She needs an FHO surgery to remove the portion of the femur head and allow the muscle to grow over and creating appropriate scar tissue. She is having her surgery with Dr. Eich at Blue Pearl today.

The surgery’s estimate is $4800-$5500. Can you help? No amount is too small, and every little bit is appreciated. If so donate here on Facebook or visit SCLRR.org to donate through PayPal or mail a donation to us at SCLRR – 24325 Crenshaw Blvd #137, Torrance, CA 90505.

Daisy, her foster parents and all the volunteers at SCLRR appreciate your consideration. We know that we live through some hard times now but we have to help Daisy be pain free once again.


Please help support this senior Lab’s recovery by making a contribution in her name to our Senior Lab Rescue Program Fund. SCLRR started this fund as a resource devoted exclusively toward the rescue, rehabilitation and unexpected medical care of our older foster dogs. Your financial support is essential in providing these deserving Labs with a second chance at life with a loving family. The Senior Lab Rescue Program Fund is dependent on your donations. We are a federally recognized non-profit tax exempt group. Any donations to us, whether to SCLRR or to SCLRR’S Senior Lab Rescue Program Fund, are tax deductible.